ATTORNEY ADVERTISING
Blog Name
SEC Whistleblower Lawyer Blog

Articles Posted in Whistleblower award

The Securities and Exchange Commission has kept busy, even through the holidays. On January 10th, 2022, the SEC put out a press release announcing that three more people have received bounties after working with SEC staff to identify and discontinue wrongdoing in the financial sector.  The first whistleblower reported their concerns internally prior to notifying the SEC. This information contributed significantly to an existing investigation. The SEC was not previously aware of this misconduct. This whistleblower’s information assisted the staff in developing a well-organized and effective investigation leading to the enforcement action.  The whistleblower kept in touch with the staff throughout the investigation to help uncover the full extent of misconduct as well as identify all possible witnesses. This information as well as other assistance also helped the SEC staff to obtain evidence of wrongdoing that was occurring overseas. Without this information from the whistleblower, the activity would have been difficult to uncover. In this case, the first whistleblower received an award of $2.6 million.The Securities and Exchange Commission has kept busy, even through the holidays. On January 10th, 2022, the SEC put out a press release announcing that three more people have received bounties after working with SEC staff to identify and discontinue wrongdoing in the financial sector. Continue reading

The SEC has announced its latest whistleblower awards for two individuals in the same case.  The first whistleblower received a bounty of more than $12.5 million after alerting the SEC to an ongoing fraudulent scheme. As a result, SEC staff initiated an investigation and the whistleblower offered continued support to them.  The second whistleblower received more than $2.5 million. This individual’s information was more “limited in nature,” but was also significant in the eventual enforcement action.  The information from both whistleblowers was original and submitted voluntarily. Information from both whistleblowers was substantial in nature and led to the successful SEC enforcement action. The amounts reflect the amount of contribution each offered. The order called the first whistleblower’s contribution “more significant.”The SEC has announced its latest whistleblower awards for two individuals in the same case.

The first whistleblower received a bounty of more than $12.5 million after alerting the SEC to an ongoing fraudulent scheme. As a result, SEC staff initiated an investigation and the whistleblower offered continued support to them. Continue reading

A whistleblower whose original information led to an investigation by the U. S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has also received a bounty of $2M from the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).  Recent amendments to the whistleblower rules mean that DOJ actions, such as deferred and non-prosecution agreements, are now subject to whistleblower awards.  The whistleblower also offered original information to both the SEC and the DOJ, as well as “extensive, ongoing assistance to both investigations.”  Both agencies opened their investigations based upon the whistleblower’s information and assistance.A whistleblower whose original information led to an investigation by the U. S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has also received a bounty of $2M from the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Recent amendments to the whistleblower rules mean that DOJ actions, such as deferred and non-prosecution agreements, are now subject to whistleblower awards. Continue reading

You may be an eligible whistleblower entitled to a reward if you voluntarily provide original information to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) or other federal agency that leads to the SEC’s issuance of sanctions of one million dollars ($1,000,000) or more. But what do those “voluntarily” and “original” requirements mean in practice? Are they significant enough to worry about?  Let’s start with that second question first. Yes, meeting these standards is essential: If your information does not meet either the voluntary or the original standards, then you will not be eligible for an SEC award.  What’s “Voluntary”?  Under Rule 240.21F-4, “voluntary” means that you give your information to the SEC or a similar federal enforcement entity before anyone from the federal government has asked you to turn over that type of information. And importantly, their request does not need to rise to the level of a subpoena or something formal; an informal request is enough.  Also, with only a few exceptions, giving the SEC information is not considered voluntary, if you are already required to reveal this information in the context of compliance—i.e., if you’re must provide that information as part of your normal job duties.You may be an eligible whistleblower entitled to a reward if you voluntarily provide original information to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) or other federal agency that leads to the SEC’s issuance of sanctions of one million dollars ($1,000,000) or more. But what do those “voluntarily” and “original” requirements mean in practice? Are they significant enough to worry about? Continue reading

If you’re deciding to become a whistleblower, there are a number of issues that you should consider. The first of these is to know that just because you provide information to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) about a potential securities violation, that does not mean that you are automatically eligible to receive a whistleblower award. So let’s look at what it takes for you to be considered “an eligible whistleblower” (i.e., someone eligible for an award).  You are likely eligible for an award if:  You are voluntarily providing original information to the SEC or another federal enforcement agency Your information reveals a potential SEC violation Your information either triggers a new SEC investigation or has a significant impact on an ongoing investigation The SEC issues more than $1 million in sanctions because of the information you uncovered  Importantly, two factors that do not affect your eligibility are your citizenship and your employment. You do not have to be a U.S. citizen to be eligible. You can be from anywhere and live anywhere (and the sanction doesn’t have to have taken place on U.S. soil, either). Additionally, you don’t have to be an official or employee of the company to make a report.If you’re deciding to become a whistleblower, there are a number of issues that you should consider. The first of these is to know that just because you provide information to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) about a potential securities violation, that does not mean that you are automatically eligible to receive a whistleblower award. So let’s look at what it takes for you to be considered “an eligible whistleblower” (i.e., someone eligible for an award). Continue reading

On September 24, 2021, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) announced that it awarded roughly $36 million to a whistleblower who provided information and assistance that “significantly contributed to the success of an SEC enforcement action as well as actions by another federal agency.”  The other agency was not named, and limited information was provided in order to protect the identity of the whistleblower.  According to the SEC’s press release, the whistleblower gave information on an illegal scheme that was crucial to the government. The whistleblower met with the SEC’s and the other agency’s staff multiple times and identified “key documents and witnesses.”  “Today’s whistleblower brought valuable new information to the attention of the SEC and to another federal agency, greatly assisting ongoing investigations…Whistleblowers can act as a springboard for an investigation or, like here, they can propel forward an already existing investigation,” said Emily Pasquinelli of the SEC’s Office of the Whistleblower.  As of this writing, the SEC has awarded about $1.1 billion to 214 people since it first issued an award in 2012. Whistleblowers are not paid with money from harmed investors, but from sanctions paid to the SEC by violators of securities laws.On September 24, 2021, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) announced that it awarded roughly $36 million to a whistleblower who provided information and assistance that “significantly contributed to the success of an SEC enforcement action as well as actions by another federal agency.”

The other agency was not named, and limited information was provided in order to protect the identity of the whistleblower. Continue reading

The SEC continues awarding monies to whistleblowers who assist staff with information that either leads to a successful enforcement action or makes things easier for investigative staff.  Two whistleblowers have been awarded a combined bounty of $11.5 million. The first whistleblower received an award of nearly $7 million, and the second received $4.5 million for information and assistance in the case.  In the SEC’s order, Secretary Vanessa Countryman stated that:  Both claimants had independently and voluntarily provided the SEC with credible and relevant information in regards to the company in question leading to a successful enforcement action The first claimant “persistently” contacted the SEC with information for years before staff finally opened an investigation Claimant 1 was also the primary source of information for the investigation, offering information that would have been nearly impossible for staff to uncover otherwise This included the identification of witnesses and helping SEC staff understand the “complex fact patterns” involved in the case The first individual “made persistent efforts to remedy the issues, while suffering hardships” Claimant 2 also voluntarily offered information that was based on “recent experience” and offered staff a “better understanding” of the issues This whistleblower also offered considerable assistance to staff throughout the investigation and assisted SEC staff evidence requests and settlement negotiations However, Claimant 2 delayed reporting to the SEC for “several years” after learning of the wrongdoing, which led to an appropriate reduction of the award  As always, all identifying information regarding the whistleblowers is kept confidential in compliance with the Dodd-Frank Act. The SEC has surpassed the $1B mark in awarding whistleblowers, which is not taken from recovered investor’s monies.The SEC continues awarding monies to whistleblowers who assist staff with information that either leads to a successful enforcement action or makes things easier for investigative staff.

Two whistleblowers have been awarded a combined bounty of $11.5 million. The first whistleblower received an award of nearly $7 million, and the second received $4.5 million for information and assistance in the case. Continue reading

In one of the highest payouts since the inception of the SEC’s Whistleblower Program, an individual recently received a total bounty of an astounding $110M. It’s the second highest award paid to a whistleblower, following a $114M award paid just last October. The SEC awarded the individual $40 million, and the other agency paid $70 million for a related action.  This brings the SEC’s Whistleblower program’s total awards to the $1 billion mark since 2012, and payments made to a total of 207 individuals. In FY2021 alone, the SEC has paid out over $500 million in whistleblower bounties. These come from financial sanctions collected from wrongdoers, such as civil penalties and disgorgement, not from money recovered on behalf of defrauded investors.  The whistleblower provided information from “significant independent analysis”  that greatly assisted both the SEC’s staff and the second agency in their investigations.  In the same press release and order, the SEC announced that a second whistleblower received a bounty of $4M after supplying information that was “much more limited” and provided after the beginning of an investigation.In one of the highest payouts since the inception of the SEC’s Whistleblower Program, an individual recently received a total bounty of an astounding $110M. It’s the second highest award paid to a whistleblower, following a $114M award paid just last October. The SEC awarded the individual $40 million, and the other agency paid $70 million for a related action. Continue reading

Badges
Contact Information